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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
britain is debating whether to lead the eu, why does turkey want to become a full member of the club? and a man who came close to the european union's first marxist prime minister has increased the political and d in athens. he was nicknamed sexting slc -- secy alexi. we went to see if there really is this problem in greece. please be warned, there is some flash photography. >> greece is a place where economic crisis has given way to social crisis. strikes paralyzing the capital, and now, political violence. somebody fired a kalashnikov. now, the left wing has increase the ante, making accusations about the secret service in the 1970's. in 1969, a bomb in the -- in milan left several dead. it is a state with in a state. a strategy of tension. today, there is the gospel of the present great government. the coalition government brought about last year has stabilized the fiscal situation, but it is politically fragile. this is becoming perhaps the first marxist prime minister. >> a secret strategy of creating violent attention. >> it is not exactly a secret strategy. i think it has been
of unemployment in the eu. the latest employment numbers for greece are from october. at that time, nearly 27% of greeks were unemployed. spanish employment levels are not much better. austria, germany, and luxembourg have the best employment numbers, but that's not enough to change a europe-wide trend. eurozone unemployment has been on the rise for the last five years. at the beginning of 2008, the jobless rate stood at 7.2%. today, 11.7% of eurozone residents looking for a job cannot find one. youth unemployment figures are especially worrisome. nearly one in four young people under the age of 25 cannot have a job. youth unemployment in spain tops 55%. >> german lawmakers began debating friday a controversial ban on the far-right party. the previous attempts to outlaw it failed in 2003. >> this new drive to ban the party came after revelations that a neo-nazi group linked to the npd carried out a decade- long string of racially motivated murders. >> a former high-ranking member of the far right npd is thought to have supplied the weapons used by the new lots is in the recent killings. along
and the eu. >> several years we have seen the impact of the eu on our economy. on the right of unemployment and social problems. i demanded renegotiation of a certain number of trees in order to control immigration, but also, they prevent france from projecting a certain number. as a result, i understand mr. cameron in his desire for renegotiation, even if the consequences would not be the same for his government and the government that i would eventually lead. >> last month, david cameron of for the u.k. the prospect of an in-out referendum. >> i want to do the same thing as great britain. if i came to power tomorrow, i would decide to organize a referendum within 12 months. i would give myself 12 months to negotiate the most important points with the european union, and at the end of that, i would ask the french people to have their say on the points that we manage to renegotiate any points that the european union refused to negotiate. >> the issue of immigration played a prominent role in last year's election during a campaign which question the nature of french national identity. the ca
for the eu. one longtimee -- campaigner is the creator of the radio. he revealed he may have to sell up his home in london, a place that is his invention headquarters. >> this is in the guinness book of records. have devices inside there. when you put your foot down, every time you do that, a little tweak of electricity comes through. it is injected into your mobile phone battery. i call myself an inventor. this workshop is where it all began. the is a graveyard of thousand domestic appliances. i am known for making the clockwork radio. that is how i wound up. i was watching the program about the spread of hiv aids in africa. the only way they could stop this disease was through radio. there was a problem. most people in africa did not have electricity. the only other form of electricity was in the form of batteries. i am thinking to myself, all those years ago, i could see myself with an old-fashioned gramophone. -- wound this thing up this thing up. it produces the volume of sound. there must be enough energy in the spring. it would drive a radio. i've only got one arm. that goes there. t
historic when we accomplish it. that is to start the work on a u.s. e.u. trans-atlantic trade that investment or airship to grow prosperity on both sides of the atlantic. it is no secret that we both faced economic challenges. we all do in this new marketplace, and a global challenge the marketplace. the fact is that europe freestanding aloud is the largest economy in the world and when you join that together with the united states of america, we have a powerful ability to be able to affect the rules of the road and to be able to raise standards and most importantly create jobs for all of our people. europe is already america's largest trading partner. a disagreement will create more jobs for additional investment and nasty note earlier this month, president obama made it clear this is a top priority for the united states. we also discussed the responsibility that we share to support fragile democracies across the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgli
barnes, thank so much. >>> the eu leaders have agreed to a drastically reduced budget. the seven-year deal for 1.28 trillion dollars is the first spending cut in the union's 27-year history. it must still be approved by the eu parliament and lawmakers are already suggesting massive cuts are not acceptable. police in three western states and mexico are still searching for a former lapd officer who was accused of killing three people and threatening dozens more. let's get an update tonight from lapd headquarters and correspondent alicia acuna. >> reporter: because of the heavy snow in the mountains, the air search with the heat seeking equipment they've been using has been grounded. however, officials do say snow on the ground does help them track folks. >> our folks are highly trained. that's what h we train for. >> reporter: the manhunt for christopher dorner carries on despite the snow. >> we're going to continue searching until either we discover that he left the mountain or we find him, one of the two. >> reporter: the last signs of the fired lapd officer were the tracks leadi
. bulgaria is now going to the eu to try to get at least some tougher sanctions on hezbollah through iran because of attempt -- they attempted to kill the ambassador in. >> if the president means what he has said repeatedly and clearly, nuclear iran means war with the united states. the president has said that he does not endorse containment of iran. they will not have, he said, nuclear weapons. if theys can cross that threshold, there must be some red line somewhere that means war with iran. >> there are other options to war. >> the worst possible scenario would be a nuclear-armed iran, think that has to be stopped. >> which the president has pledged to do. >> what he has. i think we need to work in consultation with our european allies to make sure that that doesn't happen. they have been bad players straight-on. they're not negotiating in my opinion in good faith. i think we have to understand that. >> the real question is, what to do? we can talk about this until we're blue in the face. the most painful sanctions imposed on iran are under way right now. they're not affecting their des
to see the workers have a 4r*eu6ing wage. >> we know the answer to the question, and if people happily pay more, they wouldn't buy clothes made in china over overseas. i was reporting in the 1990s, for instance, on the buy american movement in american stores where even walmart had a section of american clothes and abandoned it because people did not buy. they bought on price. i mean, it's politically popular. people in polls say i'll do it, but they don't actually vote with their money that way. melissa: in the abstract -- >> especially now. melissa: at the same time, when people say it's not o -- a living wage, even if you work 50 hours a week, you are making $18,000 a year. that's not really enough to live on. the answer is grow the whole economy. >> well, that's true. there's also a couple other answers. the vast majority of people who earn minimum wage are third r fourth earners. they are not heads of households, and they are basically teens and so forth, but in the case where you do have heads of household earnings just that little, wehave other ways of helping them. most importa
in western and north western africa. they are considered or seen by the e.u., france, as the least problematic state of the sierra. the number of youth recruited into al-qaeda so far remains very small, and they attack on soil, lack sophistication. capabilities are extremely limited, and it's affiliated networks are disorganized and weak today. the government's aggressive pursuit and imprisonment pursuit of violence extremists temporarily disrupted the growth, but like other countries, niger, are faced with the challenge of ensuring control over the borders. i mean, mori tan ya shares a long border with mali, 2240 kilometers. it's even more than algeria which it shares 1300 kilometers a border with mali. border management plays a key role in counter in all forms of smuggling and, also, as i said the fighters in northern mali, so they have adopted an aggressive approach to fight violent extremists, more than the neighbors, definitely more than mali. for example, they equipped its airport, three airports with i.t. systems. it has full passport readers, it has built 27 # -- 27 posts t
with asean, singapore, japan and korea. and we're also in dialogue with the eu. we have been talking about a bilateral investment treaty, but not necessarily with a due sense of urgency. for meeting since negotiations started in 2007 does not suggest a great deal of haste. much as it might surprise, we want this as much as you did because it is also of interest to us. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, market access issues, and goods and services, and i to be seen perspective for they can be made to define narrative. why we must work to sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to let such issues define the relationship. this is why we have proposed to create an ad hoc clearinghouse mechanism to discuss market access issues in the trade policy forum. i believe that we also need to find a new positive narrative that can bind our countries closer together. one such opportunity i feel is in the energy sector. without a shirt access to energy inputs in sufficient quantities, we will not be able to sustain our economic development. therefore, an enduring in the u.s. partner
as a terrorist organization. the second thing, in 2006 you were one of 12 senators who refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the
to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to designate the iranian revolutionary guard a terrorist organization, being one of two on two occasions to vote against sanctions that this body was trying to impose on iran, the statements you made about palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all that together. that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to our enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> no, i would not agree with that. because i have taken actions and made statements very clear as to what i believe hezbollah and hamas are as a terrorist organizations. >> if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, to vote to say that the iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. would you still vote no? >> the reason i voted no to start with... >> well i know why, you told me that. my question is would you reconsider and would you vote yes this time? or would you still vote no? >> times change. i recognize that and, yes, i would reconsider. >> well, t
the revolutionary peoples liberation hardy front, and it's on the u.s. and eu terrorist list. very anti-american, very anti-nato. they attacked turkish military and security installations. at some point that switched and they went after u.s. diplomats and u.s. military. they were particularly active during the gulf war, and they've killed dozens of people since the '70s. they finance themselves by robberies and extortion. experts don't rule out they may have been subcontracted by another group. in fact, i was reading the newspapers a short while ago, shep. there was an article that said this was a splinter group of a larger organization backed by iran and syria. now, we don't have any confirmation of that, but again, there's always the possibility that they were subcontracted by someone else, the u.s. saying that they're following turkey's lead at this point but so far, turkey is just saying that it was this leftist group. >> shepard: amy kellogg in london. thanks so much. experts call ankara one of the safest cities in the region but consider turkey's neighbors, iran to the east, syri
's some talks coming up now in kazakhstan of all places in late february involving the eu, the united states and the iranians. and so this is going to be a venue in which people are going to be able to see to a certain extent how serious iran is about negotiating on limits on its nuclear program. there hasn't been negotiations for some significant period of ti. and this is an opportunity to test the iranians. i think this initial round is not going to prove much but certainly over the next six months, i think there will be an ample opportunity to see if there is an intent on the iranian part to reach some sort of compromise. >> rose: leon panetta and others have said the following. we have no information that there's been a decision on the part of the iranian government and the most influential people there to builds a nuclear weapon and a missile that will deliver it. what do they mean when they say that? >> well, i can't really speak for them but i think it's pretty clear that iran has made the decision to have a nuclear weapons program. and there's really nothing el that explains
, but not much more than that. the eu is providing non-legal aid, i am wondering if the u.s. is considering this? and if you are ceding influence for the ron. afghanistan has asked u.s. troops to leave the province and i think within two weeks, can we get your comment on that? >> with respect to afghanistan, i understand the concerns they have expressed. appropriately, when a complaint they may have thought to be appropriately evaluated. they will be, i assure you. i have taken appropriate note and i have had a great deal of involvement in afghanistan with president karzai. there are evaluations of how things might have gone wrong or might have changed. we are working on a bilateral security arrangement and this transition process. we have had a very good conversation with the president. president obama talked to him before making announcements. we have listened very carefully to his observations about wanting to speed up the transition with respect to management of security. i can assure you that we are finely attuned to the needs of the afghan people, and the most effective ways to make this t
asking the e.u. designates hezbollah as a terrorist organization. >> reporter: graham called him one most unqualified, radical choices for secretary of defense in a long time, jenna. jenna: those comments out there. the obama administration not too happy about the comments and the process being held up. what is the administration saying about why it need the new national security team now? >> reporter: keep in mind the smart considering nominations for new secretary of defense. a nominee for cia director. president's new white house chief of staff offered this reminder we live in a dangerous world. >> between john brennan, the cia director and chuck hagel as secretary of defense we want to make sure we have those guys sitting in the chairs working because i don't want there to be something missed because of this hang up here in washington. >> reporter: you won't see action this week due to the president's day recess but capitol hill sources say the hagel nomination will be likely taken up a week from tomorrow. jenna: we'll watch that, mike, thank you. >> reporter: thank you. jon: for more
sanctions is by legislation, under the legislation, and then we have the e.u. sanctions and others that people follow mandated by the security council. the e.u. seems to be more flexible than we are, so there is operating room there. there is operating room in not putting more sanctions on the table could be helpful as an initial step. that would be important. each one of these the president would have to explain he is getting value, that the europeans to take sanctions off central banks and petroleum. that we could do things that i think are absolutely necessary. we have had a longstanding policy of not sanctioning food and medicine for good reasons, and when i was in the security council, in iraq we made them carefully. that got screwed up in oil for food, and i do not want to talk about that, but that was an example of how things could go wrong. the basis was the right basis and that even in the worst of all possible situations, you cannot punish the population, particularly, for the sins of their leaders, especially if they did not choose the leaders. we have a situation where
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)